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medication for epilepsy

Medication

Anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are the main type of treatment for most people with epilepsy. Up to 70% (7 in 10) of people could stop having seizures with the right medication. AEDs are a type of medication that aims to stop seizures from happening. They do not stop a seizure once it has started and they cannot cure epilepsy.

Information on the purpose of AEDs, how they are chosen and how the treatment is started.

Information on all anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) including dosage and side-effects.

Anti-epileptic drugs can cause side effects for some people with epilepsy. This may differ from one person to another and one drug to another.

The decision whether to start taking anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) can be difficult, and there is a lot to think about. Here we look at the benefits and risks of taking, or not taking, AEDs.

'Medication adherence' is the term used to describe how people take their medication. If you have problems taking medication it can be useful to try and understand why.

Strategies and tools are available to help you if you have difficulties taking your medictaion.

Managing your epilepsy might mean having a care plan, including a treatment plan to see whether your medication is working.

If you take medication, you may want to store it in a drug wallet or pill box to help remind you to take it as prescribed.

Monitoring epilepsy involves seeing whether your seizures are controlled, how they are affecting you, and whether you have any side effects. This might include therapeutic drug monitoring.

For most people their seizures are controlled with medication. But if treatment doesn’t stop all your seizures, or only stops some of them, there are other types of treatment that might be considered.

If someone has not had a seizure for two or more years then they may think about withdrawing (coming off) their AEDs.

If you take, or are thinking of taking, medication for your epilepsy, you might have lots of questions. There are people you can talk to.

More about medication

Read more topics about medication including medication updates and about branded and generic medication.

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