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Published:12 April 2013

Epilepsy Society's chief executive retires

Epilepsy Society’s chief executive is standing down after more than a decade at the top.Graham Faulkner joined Epilepsy Society 13 years ago, steering the charity from its focus as a specialist residential care centre to a national provider of expert epilepsy services and a world leading centre for research.

As well as providing medical and assessment services in conjunction with the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London, the charity has broadened its national horizons and now offers a range of information and support services.

Forefront of research

Announcing his retirement Graham Faulkner said: ‘I would like to think that Epilepsy Society is now an organisation fit for the 21st century. We’ve invested in a re- building programme which has given us a state-of-the-art research centre – equipped to keep us at the forefront of research – as well as some new, modern, purpose-built care homes.

‘Thanks to our regional services, information services, website and social media we’re reaching out and connecting with more people than ever before to fulfil our vision of a full life for everyone affected by epilepsy.’

And in the long term the strides we are making with our research offer the best hope of finding a cure and eventually preventing epilepsy altogether.

Fairer deal for people with epilepsy

In recent years Epilepsy Society has actively campaigned for a fairer deal for people in social care – championing the cause of independence, ordinary residence and personalised budgets.

Graham Faulkner commented:  ‘Changes to the health and welfare system are proving challenging to people with epilepsy.  Even in this day and age people really don’t understand epilepsy – the complexity and unpredictability of the condition. Throughout our 120 year history, Epilepsy Society has been a driver of innovation.

Collaborating with other charities

‘We’re rising to today’s challenges and responding by collaborating with other organisations to ensure the voice of people with epilepsy is represented in a world where many are clamouring for the same attention and the best services.

'And in the long term the strides we are making with our research offer the best hope of finding a cure and eventually preventing epilepsy altogether.'

Graham Faulkner will retire at the end of September 2013 but will maintain his interest in supporting people with epilepsy as a trustee of Daisy Garland epilepsy charity and the Roald Dahl Marvellous Children’s Charity. A search for his successor is currently underway.