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living with a long-term condition

Man looking out to sea

Epilepsy is a very individual condition: some people will have it all their life, but for others they might have it just for a period of their life and their epilepsy might 'go away'. So for some, epilepsy is a long-term condition.

Seizure control

For most people, seizures become well controlled (they still have epilepsy but the medication is stopping the seizures) and so it has little impact on them. For others, seizures may take longer to become controlled or may not respond to treatment. Epilepsy might have a greater impact on them, and they may need support and help with work, education, or daily life.

When epilepsy is a disability

Epilepsy is sometimes classed as a disability. While some people find the term ‘disability’ negative or a ‘label’ that doesn’t feel right, it can be useful to know what this term means and how it might help you access help and support.

The Equality Act 2010 is a law that aims to ensure people are treated fairly and not discriminated against. This applies to employment, school and learning, and accessing services (such as using shops, health services or leisure facilities). Groups specifically covered by the act include people with disabilities.

Epilepsy is considered a disability when it greatly affects someone’s ability to do everyday activities (such as concentrating or remembering things), over a long period of time. Epilepsy is sometimes described as a hidden disability because it is not usually obvious that someone has the condition unless they have a seizure.

Whether you feel that you have a disability or not, you are protected by the Equality Act if your epilepsy affects you in this way. Depending on your situation, there may be help available to you, such as benefits or support at home.

Want to find out more?

Find out more about what help is available including free prescriptions and discounted travel.

Find out more about benefits.

Find out about the epilepsy charter to check your rights and recommendations for the management of your care.

If you would like to talk to someone

You can also talk to someone by calling our confidential helpline.

Taken from our free Just diagnosed pack which includes 'just diagnosed' booklet, seizure diary, first aid card, helpline card, 'what would help me?' postcard and ID card.